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W. B. Ragsdale Papers

 Collection
Identifier: MS-2277

The W. B. Ragsdale Papers, ca. 1952, include a letter entitled "A Few Random Recollections of the Tennessee Evolution Trial" from Mr. Ragsdale to one of his daughter's friends about the Scopes Evolution Trial in Dayton, Tenn., during the summer of 1925. The letter describes the atmosphere of the courtroom, including the judge's concessions to the voter's opinions and to William Jennings Bryan - one of the jurors in the trial came up the walk with a bouquet for Mr. Bryan. Ragsdale also recounts following Bryan, information about the lawyers for the defense and prosecution, and meeting Scopes - he had no wish to cash in on the publicity.

Dates

  • circa 1952

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet

Abstract

The W. B. Ragsdale Papers, ca. 1952, include a letter entitled "A Few Random Recollections of the Tennessee Evolution Trial" from W. B. Ragsdale, an Associated Press reporter, about the Scopes Evolution Trial in Dayton, Tenn., during the summer of 1925.

Biographical/Historical Note

W. B. Ragsdale (1898-1986) reported for the Associated Press. He covered many events, including the Scopes Evolution Trial, William Jennings Bryan, and President Eisenhower's departure from Dulles Airport. The Scopes Trial took place in the town of Dayton, Tenn., during the summer of 1925. John Thomas Scopes, a high school teacher, was arrested and charged for teaching evolution in school, then forbidden by Tennessee law. Clarence Darrow and Dudley Field Malone were two of the more famous defense lawyers, while William Jennings Bryan, former presidential candidate, headed the prosecution. The trial spotlighted the little town, and today Dayton hosts Bryan College, named for prosecutor William Jennings Bryan.

Arrangement

Collection consists of a single folder.

Acquisition Note

Collection donated to Special Collections in September 2000.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480