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Joseph McDowell Deposition

 Collection
Identifier: MS-2416

In a deposition in Burke County, NC, court, dated March 4, 1789, Joseph McDowell testifies that James Cook told him that David Nelson had taken a gun and an otter skin shot pouch from him in 1780. While Cook has attempted to get payment from Nelson, Nelson would not pay. The testimony notes that this took place shortly before the action at King's Mountain.

Dates

  • 1789 March 4

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet

Abstract

In a deposition in Burke County, NC, court, dated March 4, 1789, Joseph McDowell testifies that James Cook told him that David Nelson had taken a gun and an otter skin shot pouch from him in 1780. While Cook has attempted to get payment from Nelson, Nelson would not pay. The testimony notes that this took place shortly before the action at King's Mountain.

Biographical/Historical Note

Born February 15, 1756 in Winchester, Va. Joseph McDowell spent his youth at Quaker Meadows in Burke County, NC. After the outbreak of the Revolution, he was attached to Charles McDowell's militia regiment and accompanied his brother on the Rutherford expedition against the Cherokees in 1776. During the absence of his brother, who was on a mission to General Gates, Joseph commanded the McDowell regiment in the Battle of King's Mountain (October 7, 1780). He was a member of the North Carolina House of Commons (1785-1788), the North Carolina Senate (1791-1795), and the North Carolina Conventions of 1788 and 1789 that met to consider ratification of the federal constitution. McDowell opposed ratification because the Constitution lacked a bill of rights. In 1797, he was elected to the fifth Congress as a Democratic-Republican, where he fought against the Alien and Sedition Acts. McDowell died on August 11, 1801.

Arrangement

Collection consists of a single folder.

Acquisition Note

This collection was purchased by Special Collections in July 2000.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480