Skip to main content

SCOUT

Special Collections Online at UT

William B. Lewis Letter

 Collection
Identifier: MS-2767

In this letter dated January 31, 1842, William B. Lewis writes to William W. Corcoran in New York. He asks Corcoran to "get a statement to that effect in writing from some of the Wall Street Brokers, as what discount Tennessee money is selling - as, in other words, the difference between Tennessee and New York money."

Dates

  • 1842 January 31

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet

Abstract

In this letter dated January 31, 1842, William B. Lewis writes to William W. Corcoran in New York. He asks Corcoran to "get a statement to that effect in writing from some of the Wall Street Brokers, as what discount Tennessee money is selling - as, in other words, the difference between Tennessee and New York money."

Biographical/Historical Note

William B. Lewis (1784-1866) was born in Virginia but lived in Tennessee most of his life. During the War of 1812 he served as Quartermaster under General Andrew Jackson. Lewis influenced Jackson to run for political office, including President in 1821, Senate in 1823, and President in 1828. Jackson appointed Lewis Second Auditor of the Treasury, and Lewis helped Jackson pen his first inaugural address. Lewis was also a member of the Kitchen Cabinet and promoted Martin Van Buren as Jackson's replacement. Lewis's influence weakened when he opposed Jackson's spoils system and Bank of the United States. After leaving Washington in 1845, he returned to his estate near Nashville. During the Civil War, he attempted to pacify locals as Union troops infiltrated the town. Afterwards, he was elected to Tennessee's House of Representatives and strongly opposed Governor William G. Brownlow's plan of harsh treatment for former Confederates. He died in 1866.

Wm. W. Corcoran, along with Mr. Riggs (mentioned in the letter), was one of the largest bankers in Washington in the 1840s.

Arrangement

This collection consists of one letter in one folder.

Acquisition Note

This collection was purchased by Special Collections in April 2006.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480