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William J. Knox Letter

 Collection
Identifier: MS-2913

In this July 11, 1863 letter to his cousin Malvina Brunnemer, William J. Knox writes about his travels to Murfreesboro, Tennessee, and his company's movement's in the south. He also talks about devastation to the Confederates: I need not tell you that old Rosy has driven old Bray out of Tenn. Prisners & deserters come in evry day. They all say Bray is whoped & his army demoralized.

Dates

  • 1863 July 11

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet

Abstract

In this July 11, 1863 letter to his cousin Malvina Brunnemer, William J. Knox writes about his travels to Murfreesboro, Tennessee, and his company's movement's in the south.

Biographical/Historical Note

William J. Knox was a soldier during the Civil War in Company C of the 33rd Indiana Infantry Volunteers. He mustered in as a Corporal and out as a Sergeant. He is likely the William J. Knox of Morgan County, Indiana, born around 1832 in Ohio to Isaac and Catherine Knox. He married Martha A. McCracken in 1855, and the couple had seven children together.

The 33 Regiment of the Indiana Infantry mustered into service on September 16, 1861, in Indianapolis, Indiana, but in October the regiment moved to Kentucky. They fought at the Battle of Thompson's Station in Tennessee, where most of the regiment were captured by Van Dorn's forces. In July, they began duty at Guy's Gap and Murfreesboro. In January 1864, the regiment re-enlisted at Christiana City, Tennessee, and took part in the Atlanta Campaign from May to September. They fought in the battles of Resaca, Dallas, New Hope Church, and Pine Hill, and occupied Atlanta from September to November 15. They took part in the siege of Savannah and the Campaign of the Carolinas, then marched to Washington, D.C., in May 1865. On July 21, 1865, in Louisville, Kentucky, the regiment was mustered out of service. By the end, 116 men had been mortally wounded, while 182 died from disease.

Arrangement

Collection consists of one folder.

Acquisition Note

Collection is property of the UTK Special Collections Library.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480