Skip to main content

SCOUT

Special Collections Online at The University of Tennessee

Hymer Friedell Papers

 Collection
Identifier: MS-2914

This collection consists of reports, letters, books, slides, and other materials documenting Hymer Friedell's work on the biological effects of radiation between 1943 and 1996. Much of the material dates from the Manhattan Project era and shortly thereafter. Of particular interest are slides documenting the aftermath of the Hiroshima bomb (1945) and a trip to Moscow (1966), books about the Manhattan project, and retrospective accounts of Friedell's work from the 1990s.

Dates

  • 1943-1996

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

1 Linear Feet

Abstract

This collection consists of reports, letters, books, slides, and other materials documenting Hymer Friedell's work on the biological effects of radiation between 1943 and 1996. Much of the material dates from the Manhattan Project era and shortly thereafter. Of particular interest are slides documenting the aftermath of the Hiroshima bomb (1945) and a trip to Moscow (1966), books about the Manhattan project, and retrospective accounts of Friedell's work from the 1990s.

Biographical/Historical Note

Hymer Louis Friedell was born on February 6, 1911 in St. Petersburg, Russia and moved with his family to Minneapolis, Minnesota in 1915. He earned both his M. D. (1936) and PhD in physics (1939) from the University of Minnesota. After graduation, he worked at the National Cancer Institute's Memorial Hospital in New York (1939-1940) and at the University of California's Hospital in San Francisco (1941-1942). Friedell joined the U. S. Army in 1942 and was stationed at the University of Chicago's Metallurgical Laboratory. He was transferred to Clinton Laboratories (now called the Oak Ridge National Laboratory) in mid-1943, where he worked as the Executive Officer of the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) Medical Division. In this role, he assisted in determining dose tolerances for new radioactive isotopes, was involved in reviewing applications for use of these isotopes, and witnessed the first test of the atomic bomb at Alamogordo, New Mexico. After the war, Friedell taught and researched at the University of California and at Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, where he spent most of his professional career. He also served with a number of professional organizations, including the National Committee on Radiation Protection (1949-1984; Vice President 1977-1983). Friedell retired from WRU in 1979 and died on May 10, 2002 in Ohio.

Arrangement

Collection consists of one box.

Acquisition Note

This collection is property of the University of Tennessee Libraries, Knoxville, Special Collections.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480