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Stephen W. Gibson Letter

 Collection
Identifier: MS-2929

In this letter to his brother Andrew J. Gibson, Stephen W. Gibson reports on his health, discusses his distaste for the three African American regiments stationed with his unit in Nashville, and asks for information about the activities of the Copperheads in his hometown.

Dates

  • 1864 June 12

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet

Abstract

In this letter to his brother Andrew J. Gibson, Stephen W. Gibson reports on his health, discusses his distaste for the three African American regiments stationed with his unit in Nashville, and asks for information about the activities of the Copperheads in his hometown.

Biographical/Historical Note

Stephen White Gibson was born to John and Anna (McNary) Gibson in Henderson County, Illinois on December 22, 1840. He was one of seven children, including Margaret (Gibson) Finney (1830-), Martha (Gibson) Dean (1832-1907), Andrew Jackson (1834-1909), Mary Ann (Gibson) Smith (1836-1904), Elizabeth (Gibson) Dean (1838-), and Robert Armstrong (1843-1848). Stephen Gibson enlisted in Company B of the 59th Illinois Volunteer Regiment on March 9, 1864. This unit fought at Stones River before being assigned to the Atlanta Campaign. It later pursued General Hood into Tennessee and was assigned to New Orleans, Louisiana and to New Braunfels, Texas. Gibson mustered out with his unit on December 8, 1865 and returned Illinois, where he married Martha Jennie Alden and had at least six children: Sarah, Nora, Charles, Frank, Maggie, and Lizzie. The family lived in Red Oak, Iowa and in Wichita, Kansas, where Stephen Gibson died on July 4, 1926.

The Copperheads were a faction of northern Democrats who opposed the American Civil War and wanted an immediate peace settlement with the Confederates. The most famous Copperhead was Ohio's Clement L. Vallandigham, who was a vehement opponent of Lincoln's policies.

Arrangement

This collection consists of single folder.

Acquisition Note

Special Collections purchased this letter on September 23, 2006.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480