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Memphis Freedman's Bureau Illustration

 Collection
Identifier: MS-3001

This collection consists of a color newspaper illustration depicting the Office the Freedmen's Bureau in Memphis, Tennessee, circa 1866-1868. It shows three seated white men, one of whom is T. A. Walker (the Superintendent of the District of Western Tennessee's Freedmen's Bureau), and a group of African-American men, who seem to be asking for their assistance.

Dates

  • circa 1866-1868

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet

Abstract

This collection consists of a color newspaper illustration depicting the Office the Freedmen's Bureau in Memphis, Tennessee, circa 1866-1868. It shows three seated white men, one of whom is T. A. Walker (the Superintendent of the District of Western Tennessee's Freedmen's Bureau), and a group of African-American men, who seem to be asking for their assistance.

Biographical/Historical Note

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, commonly known as the Freedmen's Bureau, offered assistance to newly emancipated slaves after the Civil War. Congress passed a bill authorizing the creation of the Freedmen's Bureau on March 3, 1865, and President Lincoln signed the bill into law the same day. Initially, the bill specified that the bureau would expire after a year; however, it was renewed until 1872.

Tennessee's Freedmen's Bureau was organized into three districts in 1865 by Brigadier General Clinton B. Fisk. Under Fisk, the Bureau established and managed a number of freedmen's schools. It also negotiated labor contracts between ex-slaves and white employers, provided legal counsel, and organized hospitals, orphanages, and elderly homes. After the end of Fisk's tenure in September 1866, the bureau's primary responsibility lay in managing schools. The state assumed management of the schools in February, 1867; the bureau was phased out by 1869.

Thomas A. Walker, pictured in the illustration, was the Captain of the 63rd U. S. Colored Infantry and Superintendent of the District of Western Tennessee's Freedmen's Bureau.

Arrangement

This collection consists of a single folder.

Acquisition Note

This collection was purchased by the University of Tennessee Libraries, Knoxville, Special Collections on February 20, 2007.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480