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Austin Peay Appointment

 Collection
Identifier: MS-0037

  • Staff Only

In this 1926 document, Tennessee governor Austin Peay appoints Miss Mary E. Baker as a delegate to the 50th Anniversary Conference of the American Library Association. This conference was held October 4-9, 1926, in Atlantic City, New Jersey, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Dates

  • 1926 September 28

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact Special Collections.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet (1 folder)

Abstract

In this 1926 document, Tennessee governor Austin Peay appoints Miss Mary E. Baker as a delegate to the 50th Anniversary Conference of the American Library Association. This conference was held October 4-9, 1926, in Atlantic City, New Jersey, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Biographical/Historical Note

Austin Peay was born on June 1, 1876 in Christian County, Kentucky to Austin and Cornelia Francis Leavell Peay. He studied at Centre College in Danville, Kentucky and was admitted to the Kentucky Bar in 1895. He married Sallie Hurst on September 19, 1895 and the couple settled in Clarksville, Tennessee the following year. After serving as member of the Tennessee House of Representatives (1901-1903) and Chairman of the Democratic State Committee (1905), Peay was elected governor of Tennessee in January of 1923.

Peay proved to be an extremely progressive leader. Among his major accomplishments were reorganizing the inefficient and unfair internal revenue system, establishing state licensing requirements for teachers, procuring funds to allow most public schools to offer an eight month school year, introducing a state salary schedule for teachers to ensure that they were paid a fair wage, establishing new universities and improving the quality of existing ones, and vastly improving Tennessee's road system. Most of these improvements were made in spite of an uncooperative legislature that met for only 75 days every two years. Peay died of a cerebral hemorrhage on October 2, 1927, shortly before he would have begun a third term as governor.

Arrangement

Collection consists of a single folder.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480