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Charles William Dabney Collection

 Collection
Identifier: MS-0325

The papers of Charles W. Dabney, noted entomologist, were extracted from the James D. Hoskins Collection. The material consists of several folders concerning the Association of Urban Universities. Also, there are a number of Dabney's addresses at the University of Tennessee, where he was president from 1887-1904, the University of Cincinnati, where he was president from 1904-1920, and commencement speeches given at various universities. There is also a folder entitled "Brotherhood Principles" concerning his ideas on social progress through Christianity.

Dates

  • 1883-1920

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

1 Linear Feet (1 half-box)

Abstract

The papers of Charles W. Dabney, noted entomologist, were extracted from the James D. Hoskins Collection. The material consists of several folders concerning the Association of Urban Universities, addresses at UT and Cincinnati, commencement speeches, and his Brotherhood Principles.

Biographical/Historical Note

Charles William Dabney was born on July 19, 1855, in Hampden-Sydney, Virginia to Robert Lewis and Lavinia Morrison Dabney. He completed his undergraduate education at Hampden-Sydney College and continued on to the University of Virginia, graduating with his Master's degree in chemistry in 1877. He taught for a year at Emory and Henry College, but later left and enrolled in the University of Goettingen, Germany in 1878 to continue his education. He graduated with his PhD in 1880 and returned to the United States. Dabney settled in North Carolina, married Mary Chilton Brent, and began working as the director of the North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station.

Dabney became president of the University of Tennessee in 1887. Frustrated with what he considered the University's reactionary nature, he quickly embarked on a campaign of radical reform. He made agricultural and mechanical courses mandatory, added six new four-year courses in science, updated the physics curriculum, admitted the University's first female students, began the Summer School of the South, ended the military regimen, doubled the size of the faculty, and formed both the home economics and law departments. Dabney left the University of Tennessee to take office as President of the University of Cincinnati in 1904. He died on June 15, 1945.

Arrangement

Collection consists of one box.

Acquisition Note

This collection is property of the University of Tennessee Libraries, Knoxville, Special Collections.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480