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Henry Warren Diary

 Collection
Identifier: MS-3417

In this diary, Henry Warren describes his service with the 20th Tennessee Infantry Regiment (CSA) in Tennessee and Kentucky. A document signed by Governor Isham G. Harris inside the diary nominates Warren as a Drill Master and orders him to report for duty. Both of these items have been transcribed onto a CD housed with the collection.

Dates

  • 1861 July 10-November 4

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.5 Linear Feet

Abstract

In this diary, Henry Warren describes his service with the 20th Tennessee Infantry Regiment (CSA) in Tennessee and Kentucky. A document signed by Governor Isham G. Harris inside the diary nominates Warren as a Drill Master and orders him to report for duty. Both of these items have been transcribed onto a CD housed with the collection.

Biographical/Historical Note

The 20th Tennessee Confederate Infantry Regiment was organized at Camp Trousdale in July of 1861. It was decimated at the Battle of Mill Springs, Kentucky on January 19, 1862, where it fought in the rain and General Felix K. Zollicoffer was killed. The regiment was reorganized in May of 1862 and continued to fight until April of 1865 when the remaining members became part of the 4th Consolidated Tennessee Infantry Regiment, which was paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina on May 1, 1865. No definitive information could be found regarding Henry Warren personally.

Isham Green Harris was born near Tullahoma, Tennessee on February 10, 1818. He studied law and started a practice in Paris, Tennessee in 1841. Harris served in the Tennessee Senate from 1847 to 1849 and in the U. S. Senate from 1849 to 1853. He moved to Memphis and resumed his legal practice in 1853 but soon returned to politics, serving as Governor of Tennessee from 1857 to 1861. The Tennessee electorate voted against secession in 1861, a decision that was upheld by the delegate vote, but when President Lincoln called for troops from the states (including Tennessee) Governor Harris replied with a letter stating that Tennessee will not furnish a single man for the purpose of coercion, but 50,000 if necessary for the defense of our rights and those of our Southern brothers. The Tennessee General Assembly voted on secession again in April of 1861, and on June 24 Harris issued a proclamation declaring that all connections by the State of Tennessee with the Federal Union [are] dissolved, and that Tennessee is a free, independent government, free from all obligations to or connection with the Federal Government of the United States of America. After the war ended, a $5,000 reward was offered for Harris’ apprehension, so Harris fled to Mexico and then to England. In 1867, he returned to Memphis and resumed his law practice. Harris was elected to the U. S. Senate in 1877 and served until his death on July 8, 1897.

Arrangement

This collection consists of a single folder.

Acquisition Note

Special Collections purchased these items in 2010.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480