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Gray Cemetery Memorandum of Interments

 Collection
Identifier: MS-0355

This collection is made up of Gray Cemetery's original memorandum of interments covering the years 1851 to 1877. The back portion of the ledger includes a separate list of African Americans that were buried in the cemetery during the same time period.

Dates

  • 1851-1877

Language

The material in this collection is in English.

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet

Abstract

This collection is made up of Gray Cemetery's original memorandum of interments covering the years 1851 to 1877. The back portion of the ledger includes a separate list of African Americans that were buried in the cemetery during the same time period.

Biographical/Historical Note

Old Gray Cemetery is a 13.47 acre site bounded by Broadway, Tyson and Cooper streets. The Knoxville National Cemetery is adjacent to Old Gray Cemetery on its northern boundary. Gray Cemetery (as it was known before New Gray Cemetery was established in 1892) was incorporated by the Tennessee Legislature on February 9, 1850, with a board of seven trustees. Although the land was purchased in 1850, the cemetery was not dedicated until June 1, 1852, when the first 40 lots were sold at public auction. Old Gray is one of the oldest organized cemeteries in Knoxville and the first in the city to be planned following the rural-cemetery movement. In 1854, the board of mayor and aldermen and the different churches of Knoxville were asked by the board of trustees of Gray Cemetery to procure grounds for the burial of their poor. This section is located near the south wall. In 1856, a portion of the grounds was set apart for those not wishing to buy a lot but only to make a single interment. That section in the northwest corner is often referred to as Little Ireland, since many of the Irish Catholics who came to Knoxville for the building of the railroads are buried there. In 1856, a piece of ground was also set apart for the burial of people of color whose owners or friends were willing to pay for the ground together with the sexton's fee.

Arrangement

This collection consists of one folder.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480