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Bean Station Tavern Restoration Project Records

 Collection
Identifier: MS-0190

This collection contains a report from the Tennessee Valley Authority concerning the Bean Station Restoration Project. The report contains articles, photographs, and maps displaying the progress of the restoration project. The report also contains substantial documentation on the preservation and restoration of the Bean Station Tavern.

Dates

  • 1944 April

Language

The material in this collection is in English.

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact Special Collections.

Extent

0.2 Linear Feet (2 folders)

Abstract

This collection contains a report from the Tennessee Valley Authority concerning the Bean Station Restoration Project. The report contains articles, photographs, and maps displaying the progress of the restoration project.

Biographical/Historical Note

Bean Station was founded in 1777, named after the first caucasian settler of Tennessee, William Bean. The region was once considered a major crossroad on the route from Washington, D.C. to New Orleans. The Whiteside family built several businesses in the area including the Whiteside Inn in 1811, the Bean Station Inn in 1814, and the Bean Station Tavern in 1830.

In 1863, the Battle of Bean's Station resulted in a Confederate victory, but at a steep price for both sides. The three-day battle killed nearly 300 Union and Confederate troops and wounded an additional 1,200. After the war, Bean Station again became the place to visit on the way to other states, but the invention of the automobile changed everything. In 1940, there was a push for the Tennessee Valley Authority to create additional water storage capacity for the Tennessee River System. The restoration started in 1940 and finished in 1944. A portion of Bean Station still remains at the bottom of Cherokee lake today.

Acquisition Note

This collection was donated to Special Collections by the East Tennessee Historical Society in 1944.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480