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Brown Ayres Papers

 Collection
Identifier: AR-0046

This collection consists primarily of correspondence regarding Rhodes Scholarships created while Ayres was the Chairman of the Committee for Tennessee Rhodes Scholars. Also included are materials documenting Professor A. A. Schaeffer's alleged teaching of a double moral standard for men and women, a book of telegrams, and other papers.

Dates

  • 1904-1919

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.5 Linear Feet

Abstract

This collection consists primarily of correspondence regarding Rhodes Scholarships created while Ayres was the Chairman of the Committee for Tennessee Rhodes Scholars. Also included are materials documenting Professor A. A. Schaeffer's alleged teaching of a double moral standard for men and women, a book of telegrams, and other papers.

Biographical/Historical Note

Brown Ayres was born on May 25, 1856 to Samuel Warren and Elizabeth Little (Cook) Ayres in Memphis, Tennessee. He earned his BS (1878) and MS (1888) degrees in Engineering from the Stevens Institute of Technology in New Jersey. In 1880, he became a professor of physics and electrical engineering at Tulane University in Louisiana. He married Katie Allen Anderson on July 5, 1881 and the couple had eight children: Martha Garland (Ayres) Newman (1883-1982), Samuel Warren (1886-1915), John Anderson (1890-1969), Elizabeth Cook (Ayres) Link Ayres May (1893-1980), Mary Douglas (Ayres) Ewell (1895-1999), Katherine Stewart (Ayres) Watson (1897-1990), Ruth Virginia (1899-1987), and Morgan Brown (1902-1981). Ayres rose rapidly through the ranks at Tulane, where he remained until accepting the presidency of the University of Tennessee in 1905.

As president, Ayres made a number of notable improvements to the University. He increased the number of faculty and students, made the College of Liberal Arts equal in stature to the Colleges of Agriculture and Engineering, enlarged the College of Agriculture, elevated the departments of Law, Medicine, and Dentistry to Colleges, constructed a separate library, stiffened academic requirements (resulting in recognition by the American Association of Universities), reorganized the Board of Trustees, established scholarships to attract students from outside the Knoxville area, merged the Medical and Dental Colleges with the University, and made the Summer School of the South a regular part of the University program. Ayres died on January 28, 1919 in Knoxville, Tennessee.

Arrangement

This collection consists of one box divided into two series:

Missing Title

  1. Series I: Subject File, 1904-1919
  2. Series II: Correspondence, 1906-1912

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480