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Homes of Tennessee Photograph Collection

 Collection
Identifier: MS-0771

This collection consists of a photograph album depicting several houses in Tennessee, including Belle Meade near Nashville, Tennessee, Fair View near Gallatin, and Rattle and Snap near Columbia. The photographs and album are undated and were taken and compiled by an unknown photographer.

Dates

  • undated

Language of Materials

English.

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet

Abstract

This collection consists of a photograph album depicting several houses in Tennessee, including Belle Meade near Nashville, Tennessee, Fair View near Gallatin, and Rattle and Snap near Columbia. The photographs and album are undated and were taken and compiled by an unknown photographer.

Biographical/Historical Note

Belle Meade Plantation, near Nashville, Tennessee, was initially constructed in the federal architectural style in 1820 under the supervision of the owner of the property, John Harding. The mansion has been expanded and remodeled several times over the years by its various owners. It has been historically known for its breeding and racing of thoroughbred horses.

The Rattle and Snap Plantation is located near Columbia, Tennessee. The property was owned by William Polk, who was appointed the surveyor-general of the Middle District of Tennessee in 1784. He named the property after winning the land in a game of chance called rattle and snap. The house itself was built for Polk's son George and was completed in 1845. It was built by an unknown architect in the Greek Revival architectural style, although the German-American architect Adolphus Heiman is generally thought to have built the house.

Arrangement

This collection consists of a single box.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480