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David Campbell Letter

 Collection
Identifier: MS-0793

In this letter written on September 25, 1796, Campbell accepts the position of a district judge for the Superior Court and mentions his brief acquaintance with judge he is responding to.

Dates

  • 1796 September 25

Language

The material in this collection is in English.

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet

Abstract

In this letter written on September 25, 1796, Campbell accepts the position of a district judge for the Superior Court and mentions his brief acquaintance with judge he is responding to.

Biographical/Historical Note

David Campbell was born in 1750 in Augusta County, Virginia. His parents, David and Mary Hamilton Campbell, originated from Northern Ireland and married after immigrating to America. David was named after his father and was one of eleven children.

After attending law school, Campbell joined the colonial effort in the American Revolution (1764-1789) and soon attained the position of major while on the battlefield. In 1779, he married Elizabeth Outlaw. Around 1783, after his service had ended, Campbell moved to Greene County, TN where he was initiated into the First Franklin Convention in 1784 to claim the upper east of Tennessee as its own state called Franklin. However, he did not actively participate; controversially, he received a position to become a member of the General Assembly in North Carolina, the bordering state that vehemently opposed the idea of a State of Franklin and whose representatives managed to end the proposal of the new state when the bill arrived in the legislature.

From the years 1797 to 1809, Campbell served as a judge of the Superior Court. During this time, the Treaty of Holston was hotly debated between Campbell, William Blount and John Sevier (fellow First Franklin Convention member). The Treaty of Holston in 1791 was a peace treaty that declared peace and friendship between the United States and the Cherokee Nation. The treaty caused debate due to the land rights that the Cherokee Nation and the United States claimed. Having lived in the unofficial Rhea County in Tennessee, Campbell was appointed to formally found the county by the Tennessee Legislature in 1810.

With his declining health, David Campbell rested at his many homes and eventually passed away in Rhea County, TN in the year 1812.

Acquisition Note

This item was purchased in 1975.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480