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The Last Political Conversation of Andrew Johnson

 Collection
Identifier: MS-1102

Papers relating to "The Last Political Conversation of Andrew Johnson," a document typed most likely in the 1920s by Captain McElwee, who either typed it himself or dictated it. The document, rediscovered in 1977, describes an 1875 conversation with Andrew Johnson on a train out of Knoxville, Tennessee, shortly before Johnson's death. The discussion that took place was significant in detailing parts of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln ten years earlier.

A 1977 article from The Sylacauga Times summarizes the document written by McElwee, and an Associated Press article paraphrases and notes potential limitations of it. An article from the Historical Society in Nashville, Tennessee, re-types the document and includes notes from historians about the significance of McElwee's story.

Dates

  • 1923

Language

This material is written in English.

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet (1 folder)

Abstract

Papers relating to "The Last Political Conversation of Andrew Johnson," a document typed most likely in the 1920s by Captain McElwee, who either typed it himself or dictated it. The document, rediscovered in 1977, describes an 1875 conversation with Andrew Johnson on a train out of Knoxville, Tennessee, shortly before Johnson's death. The discussion that took place was significant in detailing parts of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln ten years earlier.

Biographical/Historical Note

Born in 1835 near Rockwood, Roane County, Tennessee, William E. McElwee, a member of one of the pioneer families of Tennessee, became a captain in the Confederate army during his four years participating in the war. He was a celebrated veteran and East Tennessee historian, particularly in Roane County history. He practiced law in Rockwood for many years after the war. A few months before his death, he wrote a series of articles for the Rockwood Times detailing events from Roane County nearly a century before. He died after being hit by a car in 1929.

Arrangement

This collection is in one folder.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480