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Robert Houston Armstrong Private Journal

 Collection
Identifier: MS-1123

A bound typescript of Robert Houston Armstrong's journal recording information about his travels during 1850 and 1851, including expenditures and information about the places he visited during this time. His writings focus on his personal observations and opinions, as well as descriptions and some history of the sites.

Dates

  • 1850-1851

Language

This material is written in English.

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet (1 folder)

Abstract

A bound typescript of Robert Houston Armstrong's journal recording information about his travels during 1850 and 1851, including expenditures and information about the places he visited during this time. His writings focus on his personal observations and opinions, as well as descriptions and some history of the sites.

Biographical/Historical Note

Robert Houston Armstrong, descendant of a Revolutionary War officer who was among the first to settle in what is now Knox County, Tennessee, was born in 1825 to Amelia Houston and Drury Paine Armstrong. In 1834 he moved with his family to the home his father built, "Crescent Bend," which overlooks the Tennessee River and sits on Kingston Pike in Knoxville. By 1844 he had graduated from East Tennessee University (later the University of Tennessee) and became a lawyer. From 1859 to 1861 he served in the House of Representatives from Knox and Sevier counties, and in 1865 he was appointed Trustee of East Tennessee University.

He married Louise Franklin, whose father, J. D. Franklin, gifted them the "Bleak House," (named after the Charles Dickens novel) for their wedding, which is located a few blocks from Crescent Bend. Armstrong was a skilled amateur painter and avid traveller who lived a life of leisure that is reflected in the design of this home. In 1859 he and Louise had twin girls, Lizzie and Adelia, the latter of whom became a notable painter.

Armstrong died in 1896 and is buried in Old Gray Cemetery in Knoxville. He was survived by his wife, who died in 1910.

Arrangement

This collection is in one folder.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480