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Alexander Gurwitch and Hermann Muller Photographs

 Collection
Identifier: MS-1645

This collection consists of several photographs of scientists Alexander Gurwitch and Hermann Muller. The photographs of Gurwitch were taken in October 1933, November 1933, and November 1937 and also depict his wife and long-time collaborator Lydia. The photograph of Hermann Muller and his wife, Dorothea, was taken in 1950. Also included is a photograph of laboratory equipment.

Dates

  • 1933 October-1950

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet

Abstract

This collection consists of several photographs of scientists Alexander Gurwitch and Hermann Muller. The photographs of Gurwitch were taken in October 1933, November 1933, and November 1937 and also depict his wife and long-time collaborator Lydia. The photograph of Hermann Muller and his wife, Dorothea, was taken in 1950. Also included is a photograph of laboratory equipment.

Biographical/Historical Note

Alexander Gavrilovich Gurwitch was born on September 26, 1874 in the Ukraine. He graduated from Munich University in 1897 and then worked in the histology laboratories at the universities of Strasbourgh and Bern, where he met his future wife, Lydia Felicine. He was the first to observe biophotons and developed morphogenetic field theory. Gurwitch was professor of histology and embryology at Moscow University from 1924 to 1929 until a falling out with the Communist Party forced him to give up the position. He moved on to direct a laboratory in Leningrad until 1945 and then became director of the Institute of Experimental Biology in Leningrad until 1948. He then retired and died on July 27, 1954 in Moscow.

Hermann Joseph Muller was born on December 21, 1890 in New York City. He entered Columbia College at age sixteen and graduated in 1910. He received his Ph.D. in 1914 and accepted a position to teach biology at the William Marsh Rice Institute (now Rice University). He was interested in genetics and discovered the phenomenon of x-ray mutagenesis, for which he received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1946. He married his first wife, Jessie M. Jacobs, in 1923, and they had one son, David. Muller married his second wife, Dorothea Kantorowicz, in 1939, and they had one daughter, Helen Juliette. He passed away on April 5, 1967.

Arrangement

This collection consists of a single folder.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480