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Jackson and Decatur Broadside and John P. Decatur Letter to Andrew Jackson

 Collection
Identifier: MS-1910

The first item in this collection is a broadside entitled Jackson and Decatur featuring the text of letters to Andrew Jackson from Susan Wheeler Decatur (dated January 22, 1828) and John Pine Decatur (dated October 3, 1828). Both letters deny Jackson's supposed threat to Senator John Eppes. The second item is a letter from Decatur to Jackson dated January 21, 1829 offering his condolences on Rachel (Donelson) Jackson's death.

Dates

  • 1828 January 22-1829 January 21

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet

Abstract

The first item in this collection is a broadside entitled Jackson and Decatur featuring the text of letters to Andrew Jackson from Susan Wheeler Decatur (dated January 22, 1828) and John Pine Decatur (dated October 3, 1828). Both letters deny Jackson's supposed threat to Senator John Eppes. The second item is a letter from Decatur to Jackson dated January 21, 1829 offering his condolences on Rachel (Donelson) Jackson's death.

Biographical/Historical Note

John Pine Decatur was born to Stephen and Anne (Pine) Decatur on September 14, 1786. He was one of seven children, including Ann Pine (Decatur) McKnight Hurst (1776-1819), Stephen (1779-1820), John Pine (1781-1781), James Bruce (1782-1804), Elizabeth Josiah (1784-1785), and Joseph Hill (ca. 1790-1802). Decatur was appointed a Master in the U.S. Navy on August 4, 1807 and married Maria Susanna Ten Ecyk on April 6, 1809. He resigned his commission at his wife's behest on March 26, 1810. The couple had eight children: Maria Susanna (1810-1879), Anna Pine (1812-1896), Stephen (1814-1876), Thomas Ten Eyck (1816-1819), Susan (1820-1873), John Pine (1823-1857), Margaret Ten Eyck (1826-1827), and Andrew Jackson (1828-1875). After a brief career as one of the proprietors of the Bellona Powder Mills in Belleville, New Jersey, Decatur returned to the military. He was commissioned as a Captain of the Fifth Company of the Essex Squadron of Cavalry on May 11, 1812 and eventually rose to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel, although he finished the War of 1812 as a Major. Decatur continued his career in the Navy, serving as Naval Store Keeper in the Brooklyn and Portsmouth Navy Yards. On April 8, 1829 President Andrew Jackson (an intimate friend of Decatur's) appointed him Collector of the Customs for the District of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Decatur was appointed Sutler to the Army at Fort Gibson, Arkansas in April of 1831 and died of typhoid fever on November 12, 1832.

Stephen Decatur Jr. married Susan Wheeler (1776-1850) on March 8, 1806. Decatur had become a prominent national figure as a result of his service in the quasi-war with France (1798-1800) and in the War of 1812. In 1819, Commodore James Barron (who Decatur had previously found against in a Navy court martial) accused Decatur of slander and challenged him to a duel. The men fought on Bladensburg Dueling Field in Bladensburg, Maryland on March 22, 1820. Decatur sustained a severe abdominal wound and died later that night. His widow died penniless in 1850 despite having inherited $75,000 from her husband.

Andrew Jackson was the seventh President of the United States, serving from 1829 to 1837. Born in 1767 in the frontier settlement of the Waxhaws in South Carolina, Jackson moved to Salisbury, NC in 1784 and received his license to practice law in 1787, beginning his practice in North Carolina's Western District in Washington County (now a part of Tennessee). In October 1788, he moved to Nashville, where he met his wife Rachel. After serving as the major general of the Tennessee militia for twenty years and earning recognition as a military leader in the War of 1812, Jackson was elected to the U. S. Senate in 1823 and to the presidency in 1828. After serving two terms as president, Jackson returned to the Hermitage, his Nashville home, in early 1837. Eight years later, in 1845, Jackson died at his home at the age of 78.

Arrangement

This collection consists of a single folder.

Acquisition Note

Special Collections purchased this collection.

Digitized Materials

John P. Decatur's 1829 letter to Jackson was digitized as part of the Tennessee Documentary History project. These digital materials can be accessed through the project’s webpage located at http://diglib.lib.utk.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=tdh;cc=tdh;tpl=home.tpl

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480