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Solomon Moor Receipt

 Collection
Identifier: MS-2036

This collection is comprised of a single receipt signed by Solomoon Morr and John Kelley to David Henley, war department agent. The receipt was written on March 26, 1797, Knoxville, Tennessee. It was given as an advance of two-hundred dollars for the transportation of Creeks, Chickasaws, and Cherokee Indians from Philadelphia to Knoxville.

Dates

  • 1797

Language

The material in this collection is in English.

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet

Abstract

This collection is comprised of a single receipt signed by Solomoon Morr and John Kelley to David Henley, war department agent. The receipt was written on March 26, 1797, Knoxville, Tennessee. It was given as an advance of two-hundred dollars for the transportation of Creeks, Chickasaws, and Cherokee Indians from Philadelphia to Knoxville.

Biographical/Historical Note

David Henley was born February 12, 1748 in Charlestown, Massachusetts. In 1775, he was appointed Brigade Major to General Heath. He served in the Revolutionary War and helped set fire to Charlestown which was occupied by the British. In 1776, he was appointed Deputy Adjutant General and served in that position until he was appointed Colonel of Massachusetts Regiment in 1777. In 1793, Henley became an Agent for the War Department, which was in charge of Indian Affairs. He served this position until 1801. Henley died on January 1, 1823.

In 1794, tensions started to build between the Chickasaw and the Creek Indians. In 1795, a group of Creek Indians were attacked and scalped. After a retaliatory attack on the Creek, Captain William Colbert, a Chickasaw chief, went to Nashville to ask for support from the governor against Creek aggression. Colbert was denied and he decided to take his complaint to Philadelphia. A group of delegates were assigned to escort the Chickasaw from Knoxville to Philadelphia to see President Washington speak about the dispute between the Chickasaws, the Creek Nation, and the United States government.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480