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Special Collections Online at The University of Tennessee

John Cocke Letter

 Collection
Identifier: MS-0731

In this letter, John Cocke orders Colonel Ewen Allison (stationed in Greeneville, Tennessee) to ready a brigade of men to repel what Cocke fears is a forthcoming attack by the Creek tribe. Allison is further instructed not only to repel them but to chastise them. Cocke closes by reminding Allison be careful not to mistreat peaceable Indigenous people but treat them with hospitality and friendship.

Dates

  • 1813 September 6

Language of Materials

English.

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet

Abstract

In this letter, John Cocke orders Colonel Ewen Allison (stationed in Greeneville, Tennessee) to ready a brigade of men to repel what Cocke fears is a forthcoming attack by the Creek tribe. Allison is further instructed not only to repel them but to chastise them. Cocke closes by reminding Allison be careful not to mistreat peaceable Indigenous people but treat them with hospitality and friendship.

Biographical/Historical Note

John Cocke was born in Brunswick, Virginia in 1772. He came to Tennessee with his parents and studied law after completing his primary education. He was admitted to the Bar in 1793 and practiced in Hawkins County. Cocke entered politics in 1796 when he was elected to the Tennessee House of Representatives. He was reelected in 1797 and went on to serve in the Tennessee Senate from 1799 to 1801. He returned to the Tennessee House of Representatives in 1807, 1809, and 1812. Cocke served as a Major General during the Creek War of 1813 and later fought with Andrew Jackson in New Orleans. After leaving the military, Cocke entered national politics. He was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1819 and served until 1826. After leaving the House, Cocke became a farmer and founded a school for deaf children. He returned to politics twice, once as a member of the Tennessee House in 1837 and once as a member of the Tennessee Senate in 1843, before dying in Rutledge, Tennessee on February 16, 1854.

Arrangement

This collection consists of a single folder.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480