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United States Postal Service Call for Proposals

 Collection
Identifier: MS-3551

This manuscript consists of a printed call for bids to carry the mail from Loudon to Chattanooga and back three times a week, a form for submitting a bid for the contract, and an envelope addressed to William G. Brownlow. On the bottom of the call for bids, John Bell Brownlow has written that it had been authorized for publication, and on the back he has written that he will explain these when he sees the recipient. The envelope is postmarked August 8, and has a note on the back, not in J.B. Brownlow's hand.

Dates

  • 1870 April 30

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet

Abstract

This manuscript consists of a printed call for bids to carry the mail from Loudon to Chattanooga and back three times a week, a form for submitting a bid for the contract, and an envelope addressed to William G. Brownlow. On the bottom of the call for bids, John Bell Brownlow has written that it had been authorized for publication, and on the back he has written that he will explain these when he sees the recipient. The envelope is postmarked August 8, and has a note on the back, not in J.B. Brownlow's hand.

Biographical/Historical Note

John Bell Brownlow was born to William Gannaway "Parson" Brownlow, an ardent East Tennessee Unionist and editor of the Knoxville Whig, and Eliza O'Brien Brownlow in Elizabethton, Tennessee on October 19, 1839. He graduated from Emory and Henry College in Virginia and then served a long internship at his father's newspaper. During the Civil War, Brownlow commanded the Union's 9th Regiment of Tennessee Cavalry. After the war, he served as a special agent for the United States Treasury Department (1865-1866) and then worked for the United States Post Office. In 1904, Brownlow and his son, William G. Brownlow II, started Knoxville's first real estate firm, J. B. & W. G. Brownlow Co. John Bell Brownlow died in 1922.

William Gannaway "Parson" Brownlow (1805-1877) was an influential East Tennessee minister, journalist, and governor. In 1838 he became owner/editor of an Elizabethton newspaper popularly known as Brownlow's Whig . His newspaper, which on the eve of the Civil War reached nearly eleven thousand subscribers across the nation, moved to Knoxville in 1849. The Parson was a prominent spokesperson for the Whig Party and a staunch defender of the Union. After Tennessee left the Union, Brownlow continued speaking out against the Confederacy. He was eventually jailed in Knoxville and later expelled from the Confederacy for his anti-secession editorials. After traveling on a speaking tour throughout the North, the Parson returned to Knoxville with the Union troops in the fall of 1863, continuing to rail against the Confederacy and secession. In March 1865, Tennessee Unionists chose Brownlow to succeed Andrew Johnson as governor of Tennessee. After two terms as Tennessee's Reconstruction-era governor, Brownlow was chosen to represent the state in the U. S. Senate. He served only one term before returning to Knoxville, where he died on April 28, 1877.

Jonathan A.J. Creswell was born in Cecil County, Maryland on November 18, 1828. He graduated from Dickinson College in 1848 and married Hannah J. Richardson on May 25, 1857. From 1850 to 1861, he practiced law while participating in politics as a Whig, a Democrat, and then a Republican. He was elected to the Maryland House of Delegates in 1861, to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1862, and to the U.S. Senate in 1865. In 1868, President Grant appointed him Postmaster General and he served in this capacity until resigning in 1874. After this political career, Creswell practiced law and banking in Maryland. He died on December 23, 1891.

Arrangement

This collection consists of a single folder.

Acquisition Note

This collection was purchased by Special Collections in 1996.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480