Skip to main content

SCOUT

Special Collections Online at UT

Union League of America Circular

 Collection
Identifier: MS-3584

This circular was distributed before the Tennessee gubernatorial election of 1868 in order to explain why the Conservative Party of Tennessee and their candidate, Emerson Etheridge, should be neither elected nor believed. It quotes the seven planks of that party's platform and elaborates upon section three, about restoring the franchise to former rebels, and section four, claiming that former enslavers are the best hope for the Black citizens of Tennessee. It then says why taxes are necessary to pay for the debts incurred by the Conservatives and the militias hired to protect Union men from Rebels. It closes by likening the election to a battle with the same issues as the recent War.

Dates

  • circa 1867

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet

Abstract

This circular was distributed before the Tennessee gubernatorial election of 1868 in order to explain why the Conservative Party of Tennessee and their candidate, Emerson Etheridge, should be neither elected nor believed.

Biographical/Historical Note

The Union League of America was organized by liberal union sympathizers in 1862, beginning in Tazewell County, Ohio. During the War, they raised funds for sick and wounded soldiers, and during Reconstruction, they spread South to promote Black franchise. They gathered the new Nlack voters into local councils where they were praised, empowered, and required to vote Republican. Parson Brownlow was very supportive of these efforts, and spoke at many of their meetings. Shortly after arriving in the South, conservative whites responded to their efforts by organizing the Ku Klux Klan. The League died out in the early 1870's.

Arrangement

This collection consists of a single folder.

Acquisition Note

Special Collections purchased this circular in 2000.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480