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A.A. Taylor Report on Pensions for East Tennesseans

 Collection
Identifier: MS-3604

This three-page leaflet presents the text from Alfred A. Taylor's report to the 51st U.S. House of Representatives, to accompany H.R. 13424. It calls for pensions to be provided for the survivors and widows of the group who successfully burned bridges around Knoxville in November of 1861. To justify this request, Taylor recounted the plans and results of that event and then referred to H.R. 7051 that had established pensions for men who had failed in their attempt to burn bridges around Chattanooga.

Dates

  • circa 1891

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet

Abstract

This three-page leaflet presents the text from Alfred A. Taylor's report to the 51st U.S. House of Representatives, to accompany H.R. 13424. It calls for pensions to be provided for the survivors and widows of the group who successfully burned bridges around Knoxville in November of 1861. To justify this request, Taylor recounted the plans and results of that event and then referred to H.R. 7051 that had established pensions for men who had failed in their attempt to burn bridges around Chattanooga.

Biographical/Historical Note

Alfred Alexander Taylor was born on August 6, 1848, in Happy Valley, Tennessee to Nathaniel and Emma (Haynes) Taylor. He was admitted to the bar and began practicing law in Jonesboro, Tennessee in 1874 and served in the Tennessee House of Representatives from 1875 to 1877. Taylor married Jennie Anderson in 1881 and they had ten children. In 1886 he ran for Tennessee governor against his brother Robert. The Memphis Appeal dubbed this Tennesee's War of the Roses. Alfred lost the election, but after their political careers, he and his brother lectured on tour together. Taylor served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1889 to 1895 before returning to law in Johnson City, Tennessee and going on tour. He was elected the governor of Tennessee in 1920, the first election with female suffrage, but lost the 1922 election. Taylor died on November 25, 1931 in Johnson City, Tennessee.

Arrangement

This collection consists of a single folder.

Acquisition Note

This leaflet was a gift to Special Collections from Mrs. Broadus Farrar.

Related Archival Materials

Interested researchers may wish to consult MS.3583 Malinda Harmon Relief Act, about one of the Lick Creek Bridge widows.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480