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John C. Gunn Circular

 Collection
Identifier: MS-3615

This eight-page circular, addressed to the voters of Knox and Anderson counties, provides a brief history of Gunn’s life with references to his character, as part of his campaign for the Tennessee House of Representatives against General Dunlap and Colonel Tunnel. Gunn wants to work to improve opportunities in East Tennessee by building a road from Knoxville to New Orleans, using federal funds, and he refers to the benefits that came to New York from their canals. He is passionately opposed to the extravagance of East Tennessee College, allowing Dr. Coffin to teach thirty five students when so many others could be educated for less. Gunn closes his essay by assuring the voters that he will have lived in Tennessee for the required three years by the day of the election.

Dates

  • 1829 July 24

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet

Abstract

This eight-page circular, addressed to the voters of Knox and Anderson counties, provides a brief history of Gunn’s life with references to his character, as part of his campaign for the Tennessee House of Representatives against General Dunlap and Colonel Tunnel.

Biographical/Historical Note

John C. Gunn was born circa 1795. In 1826 he moved to Tennessee. He is best known for his book Gunn’s Domestic Medicine, first published in 1830 and last released in 1920. The work was frequently used by many households and autodidacts. Gunn died in 1863.

Richard G Dunlap was born in Knox County, Tennessee. He served in the Tennessee House of Representatives from 1820 to 1831, before moving to Texas where he was the republic’s Secretary of the Treasury from 1838 to 1839 and its minster to the United States from 1839 to 1840. He died on June 24, 1841 in New Orleans, Louisiana.

William Tunnel was born on November 14, 1775 in Fairfax County, Virginia. He married Elizabeth Worthington on August 29, 1797 and they had ten children together. He was a colonel in the War of 1812, and he served four terms in the Tennessee House of Representatives between 1820 and 1837. Tunnel died on June 14, 1861 in Anderson County, Tennessee.

Arrangement

This collection consists of a single folder.

Acquisition Note

This circular is the property of Special Collections.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480