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Felix Grundy Circular

 Collection
Identifier: MS-3613

Felix Grundy had this circular printed in order to inform the voters of Rutherford, Williamson, and Davidson counties of his political views as he aspires to be the "Representative of a free and enlightened people." He is in favor of letting people elect the president and vice president directly, apart from the interference of the House of Representatives, under any circumstances, a reference to President Adams. He also believes that states need to retain more rights, in order to keep the federal government from interfering and creating unnecessary offices. He does not approve of making alliances with other countries, specifically those in South America. Finally, he recommends Andrew Jackson for president. The circular is signed in type by Felix Grundy and has a manicule pointing to the words "Please show this to your neighbors."

Dates

  • 1826 October

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet

Abstract

Felix Grundy had this circular printed in order to inform the voters of Rutherford, Williamson, and Davidson counties of his political views as he aspired to be the "Representative of a free and enlightened people."

Biographical/Historical Note

Felix Grundy was born on September 11, 1777 in Berkeley County, Virginia. He was admitted to the Kentucky state bar in 1797 and began practicing in Bardstown. Grundy served in the Kentucky Constitutional Convention in 1799 and went on to serve as a member of the State House of Representatives from 1800 to 1805. He was chosen as Judge of the Kentucky Supreme Court in 1806 and was promoted to Chief Justice in 1807. He soon resigned and moved to Nashville, where he resumed his legal practice before serving in the U.S. House of Representatives (1811-1814) and in the Tennessee House of Representatives (1819-1825).

Grundy was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1833 to fill the vacancy caused by John Eaton's resignation. He resigned in 1838 to accept a cabinet position and was appointed Attorney General in July of the same year. He resigned in December of 1839, having been elected to the U.S. Senate to fill the vacancy caused by Ephraim Foster's resignation. Grundy's eligibility was questioned on the grounds that he had been serving as Attorney General at the time of his election, but he was re-elected and served until his death in Nashville, Tennessee on December 19, 1840.

Arrangement

This collection consists of a single folder.

Acquisition Note

Special Collections purchased this document in 1988.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480