Skip to main content

SCOUT

Special Collections Online at The University of Tennessee

Franklin Repository Campaign Broadside

 Collection
Identifier: MS-3614

This broadside was published as an extra to the Franklin Repository in order to report on the results of the recent Young Men’s Administration Meeting. At that meeting, the young men agreed that as the current administration has improved the situation for agriculture and manufacturing, it should be kept in the next election. They believe that General Jackson will not support the tariff they need, and that he is unqualified to hold the office of president for a number of reasons. They support the Union, the tariff, John Quincy Adams for president, Richard Rush for vice president, and Henry Clay’s recent vindication. The proclamation ends with their support for the nominations of George Chambers, of Franklin County, and James Wilson, of Adams County, as their next representatives to congress. It is signed in type by Andrew Snively, president; William M. Fahnestock and Alexander Maclay, vice presidents; and William B. Bard and William Orr, secretaries.

Dates

  • 1828 October 7

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet

Abstract

This broadside was published as an extra to the Franklin Repository in order to report on the results of the recent Young Men’s Administration Meeting. At that meeting, the young men agreed that as the current administration has improved the situation for agriculture and manufacturing, it should be kept in the next election. They believe that General Jackson will not support the tariff they need, and that he is unqualified to hold the office of president for a number of reasons. The proclamation ends with their support for the nominations of George Chambers, of Franklin County, and James Wilson, of Adams County, as their next representatives to congress. It is signed in type by Andrew Snively, president; William M. Fahnestock and Alexander Maclay, vice presidents; and William B. Bard and William Orr, secretaries.

Biographical/Historical Note

Andrew Jackson was the seventh President of the United States, serving from 1829 to 1837. Born in 1767 in the frontier settlement of the Waxhaws in South Carolina, Jackson moved to Salisbury, NC in 1784 and received his license to practice law in 1787, beginning his practice in North Carolina's Western District in Washington County (now a part of Tennessee). In October 1788, he moved to Nashville, where he met his wife Rachel. After serving as the major general of the Tennessee militia for twenty years and earning recognition as a military leader in the War of 1812, Jackson was elected to the U. S. Senate in 1823 and to the presidency in 1828. After serving two terms as president, Jackson returned to the Hermitage, his Nashville home, in early 1837. Eight years later, in 1845, Jackson died at his home at the age of 78.

John Quincy Adams was born on July 11, 1767 in Braintree, Massachusetts to John and Abigail (Smith) Adams. He graduated from Harvard College in 1787 and began practicing law in 1790. He married Louisa Jonson in 1797 and they had three sons as well as a daughter who died in infancy. His diplomatic career included posts in the Netherlands, Berlin, and Russia, and while he was Secretary of State he assisted James Monroe in developing the Monroe Doctrine. He became the sixth president of the United States in the 1824 election when the House of Representatives chose him after Henry Clay gave him his own votes. After losing the 1828 election to Andrew Jackson, Adams returned to Massachusetts until he was elected to the House of Representatives in 1830. He served there until his death on February 23, 1848.

Franklin County, Pennsylvania was formed from Cumberland County on September 9, 1784. It was named for Benjamin Franklin.

Arrangement

This collection consists of a single folder.

Acquisition Note

This document is the property of Special Collections.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480