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Charles Chaillé-Long Letter

 Collection
Identifier: MS-3694

This collection contains a letter, dated June 23, 1892, by Charles Chaillé-Long, an American soldier and a member of Charles Gordon’s staff in the Egyptian Equatoria province. The letter is to British explorer and abolitionist Samuel White Baker, Gordon’s predecessor as Governor-General of Equatoria. The letter addresses Chaillé-Long’s book that has a negative outlook on General Gordon.

The letter also touches on several points of British policy in Africa and slavery. In addition, Chaillé-Long talks about prospective German and English editions of his L'Egypt et ses Provinces Perdu, (1892), mentioning the Macmillan publishing house and a potential German translator, Mr. Leopold Lindau in Berlin. He also encourages Baker to communicate any criticisms regarding his book.

Dates

  • 1892

Language

The language of the material is English.

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet

Abstract

This collection contains a letter, dated June 23, 1892, by Charles Chaillé-Long, an American soldier and a member of Charles Gordon’s staff in the Egyptian Equatoria province. The letter is to British explorer and abolitionist Samuel White Baker, Gordon’s predecessor as Governor-General of Equatoria. The letter addresses Chaillé-Long’s book that has a negative outlook on General Gordon.

Biographical/Historical Note

Charles Chaillé-Long (1842-1917) was an American soldier, African explorer, and writer. After serving in the Civil War, he was commissioned (1869) in the Egyptian Army under General Charles G. Gordon. Chaillé-Long explored the Victoria, the Nile, and was awarded a medal by the American Geographical Society. In 1875, he crossed the Congo-Nile divide to the Bahr Ghazal region. He returned to the United States, graduated from Columbia Law School, and became consul general and secretary to the legation in Korea.

Charles Gordon (1833-1885) was a British general who served the interests of the empire in Eurasia, China and Africa. First serving in the Crimean War, he was later sent to fight and suppress the Taiping Rebellion in China, being honored by both Britain and China. He then went to Africa and eventually became the Governor-General of the Sudan, suppressing revolts and the slave trade there. He retired and returned to Egypt in 1880, only to be called back into service in the Sudan to secure the evacuation of British subjects and allies. After their evacuation, Gordon established a resistance in the city of Khartoum to oppose the uprising. He died in the defense of the city after almost a year.

Sir Samuel White Baker (1821-1893) was a British explorer, officer, naturalist, big game hunter, engineer, writer and abolitionist. He held the titles of Pasha and Major-General in the Ottoman Empire and Egypt. He served as the Governor-General of the Equatorial Nile Basin, which he established as the Province of Equatoria. He is mostly remembered as the discoverer of Lake Albert, an explorer of the Nile and interior of central Africa, and his exploits as a big game hunter in Asia, Africa, Europe and North America. Baker wrote a considerable number of books and published articles. He was a friend of King Edward VII who as, Prince of Wales, visited Baker with Queen Alexandra in Egypt.

Acquisition Note

This item was purchased by Special Collections in 2013.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480