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Egypt and Sudan Voyage Album

 Collection
Identifier: MS-3699

This photograph album, containing 96 photographs circa 1900, documents a Nile voyage from Alexandria to Khartoum, situated at the confluence of the White and Blue Nile. The album includes scenic images of travelers, banks of the Nile, cities and towns visited as well as archaeological sites. This album was created shortly after Sudan was put under British-Egyptian administration in 1899.

Dates

  • circa 1900

Language

The language of the materials is English.

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.25 Linear Feet

Abstract

This photograph album, containing 96 photographs circa 1900, documents a Nile voyage from Alexandria to Khartoum, situated at the confluence of the White and Blue Nile. The album includes scenic images of travelers, banks of the Nile, cities and towns visited as well as archaeological sites. This album was created shortly after Sudan was put under British-Egyptian administration in 1899.

Biographical/Historical Note

After the British-Egyptian campaigns in Sudan between 1896 and 1898 led by Lord Kitchner, the joint Anglo-Egyptian power was enforced in the region. The Sudan would be ruled by a governor-general appointed by Egypt but given consent by England. In effect, Sudan was ruled as another English imperial possession. Starting in 1924, the Sudan was divided into two separate territories; a predominantly Muslim Arabic-speaking north, and a predominantly Animist and Christian south, where the use of English was encouraged.

With the collapse of the Ottoman Empire in 1914, Egypt established itself as a joint sultanate with Sudan, claiming full rights to the region. Though the Sultan persisted, England continued to dictate many affairs of both Egypt and Sudan. With Egypt unable to take power back from England, Sudan revolted initially diplomatically and then militarily, ending in defeat both times. British forces stayed in Sudan after leaving Egypt officially in 1936 - save for the Suez - until the Egyptian Revolution of 1952.

Acquisition Note

This item was purchased by Special Collections in 2013.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480