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Glass Plate Negative Collection

 Collection
Identifier: MS-3807

The Glass Plate Negative Collection consists of hundreds of glass plate negatives taken in the United States and internationally between 1903 and 1936. Siblings Anna Chandler and S. Virgil Chandler collected and organized the glass plate negatives by state, U.S. and North American region, and international country based on their own travel and study in these locations. The collection also includes uncategorized glass plate negatives, as well as photographic prints and negatives derived from the glass plates.

Dates

  • 1903-1936

Language

The material in this collection is in English.

Conditions Governing Access

Manuscript and University Archives collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 24 hours is needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

30 Linear Feet (70 boxes)

Abstract

The Glass Plate Negative Collection consists of hundreds of glass plate negatives taken in the United States and internationally between 1903 and 1936. Siblings Anna Chandler and S. Virgil Chandler collected and organized the glass plate negatives by state, U.S. and North American region, and international country. The collection also includes uncategorized glass plate negatives, as well as photographic prints and negatives derived from the glass plates.

Biographical/Historical Note

Prior to the invention of cellulose nitrate film in 1903, the prominent way to expose and develop photographic negatives was on glass supports known as glass plate negatives. Two formats, the collodion wet plate negative and the gelatin dry plate negative, prevailed from the 1850s up to the 1920s. Both consist of a light sensitive emulsion with a binder thinly layered on one side of a glass plate. The two formats are very fragile and require careful handling, as they are prone to break easily.

The glass plate negatives in this collection have been set using the dry glass plate method. British physician and photographer Richard Leach Maddox first produced the dry plate negative in 1871, using a more convenient process than the wet plate method that did not require the photographer to immediately develop the negative upon light exposure. Its ease of use allowed for the dry plate negative to be mass manufactured and for amateur photographers to take their own photos on location.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480