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"The Last Interview with Ex-President Johnson"

 Collection
Identifier: MS-1088

  • Staff Only

This collection is a four page typescript with handwritten edits from Andrew J. Kellar recounting his last interview with President Andrew Johnson in Nashville, Tennessee. Kellar typed and signed this document in June 1896 in Hot Spring, South Dakota.

Dates

  • 1896 June

Language

This collection is in English.

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet (1 folder)

Abstract

This collection is a four page typescript with handwritten edits from Andrew J. Kellar recounting his last interview with President Andrew Johnson in Nashville, Tennessee.

Biographical/Historical Note

Andrew J. Kellar was born in 1838 to Sarah (Conley) and George Kellar in Tennessee. He practiced law in Tennessee until enlisting with the Confederate army in 1861 at the beginning of the Civil War. Following the war, he resumed his law practice as well as began work in politics. In 1865, he married Margaret Chambers. He was a close friend and supporter of Andrew Johnson. In 1893, Kellar relocated to South Dakota.

Andrew Johnson served as the seventeenth president of the United States. Johnson settled early in his life in Greeneville, Tennessee; he was educated as an attorney and later served in the Tennessee General Assembly. Johnson further served in the offices of governor of Tennessee, U. S. Representative and U. S. Senator. He served as Vice-President of the United States during the Civil War. Upon Lincoln's assassination, Johnson became the new president; however, he and Congress clashed over control during the Reconstruction Era, and in 1868, the House Republicans in Congress impeached Johnson, the first president to face impeachment. Johnson's presidency was spared by a single vote in the Senate. After leaving the White House, Johnson uncharacteristically returned to politics, and he served as a Tennessee Senator before dying from a stroke in 1875.

Arrangement

This collection is in one folder.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480