Skip to main content

SCOUT

Special Collections Online at The University of Tennessee

Winfield Dunn Collection

 Collection
Identifier: MPA-0173
The collection documents many of Tennessee Governor Winfield Dunn's activities between 1971 and 1975. Material includes addresses, messages, and statements; legislative summaries; attempts by the governor to veto legislation.

Dates

  • 1971-1975

Language of Materials note

The material in this collection is in English.

Conditions Governing Access

The Modern Political Archives are housed at the Howard H. Baker Center for Public Policy. Researchers interested in consulting the MPA collections are advised to contact the Modern Political Archives .

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Modern Political Archives .

Extent

0.25 Linear Feet (1 box)

Abstract

The collection documents many of Tennessee Governor Winfield Dunn's activities between 1971 and 1975. Material includes addresses, messages, and statements; legislative summaries; attempts by the governor to veto legislation.

Biographical/Historical Note

Winfield C. Dunn was born in Meridian, Mississippi in 1927. He is the son of United States Representative Albert C. Dunn and Dorothy Crum Dunn. Dunn earned a business administration degree with a Political Science minor from the University of Mississippi. He graduated from the dental school at the University of Tennessee in Memphis. He practiced dentistry in Memphis, Tennessee.

Dunn defeated John J. Hooker in the gubernatorial election of 1970. He was the governor of the State of Tennessee between 1971 and 1975. He was the first Republican in nearly fifty years to occupy that position. Though Dunn was involved in Republican Party politics since his undergraduate years, he had not held political office when he defeated Hooker.

As governor Dunn was involved in the formation of a statewide kindergarten program, an acceleration of highway construction legislation, reorganization of the state government branches, and an attempt to bridge the partisan and regional divisions within the state. Following his departure from the governor’s office, Dunn became involved in charitable organizations, Tennessee higher education, and the medical field. He remained active in Republican politics.

Previous Citation

This collection was previously listed as MS.0949

Processing Information note

This collection was arranged and described by Matthew Brown in February 2012.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480