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Baxter James Hodge Papers

 Collection
Identifier: MS-2076

The Baxter J. Hodge Papers, 1888-1897, document the early part of Hodge’s career as an architect in Nashville, Tennessee. During these years, Hodge designed several prominent Nashville buildings along with a number of private residences. This collection contains contractor’s bids for various projects, formal contracts between Hodge, his clients, and selected contractors, drawings of various projects, and blueprints.

Dates

  • 1888-1897

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

3.75 Linear Feet

Abstract

The Baxter J. Hodge Papers, 1888-1897, document the early part of Hodge’s career as an architect in Nashville, Tennessee. During these years, Hodge designed several prominent Nashville buildings along with a number of private residences. This collection contains contractor’s bids for various projects, formal contracts between Hodge, his clients, and selected contractors, drawings of various projects, and blueprints.

Biographical/Historical Note

Baxter James Hodge was born to William Baxter and Sarah Ann (Harrison) Hodge in September of 1861. He married Annie W. Jordan (1861-1942) in Davidson County, Tennessee on December 29, 1881 and the couple had two daughters. At the times covered in this collection, Hodge worked in partnership with J. E. R. Carpenter as Hodge & Carpenter, Architects, and maintained an office in Nashville’s Cole building. Hodge designed several prominent Nashville buildings, including Christ Church (in partnership with New York architect Francis H. Kimball), the Protestant Orphan Asylum, and the Commerce Building. He also designed a number of residences, including the G. P. Rose house, the Tarkington house, and the Weakley house. Many of these homes still stand today. Several of Hodge’s buildings are now on the National Register of Historic Places, for example Saint Patrick’s Church. Hodge continued his architectural work into the twentieth century, although these years are not covered in this collection. He died in Nashville, Tennessee on June 18, 1949.

Arrangement

Collection contains two boxes divided into six series:

Missing Title

  1. Series I: Whole Publications
  2. Series II: Correspondence
  3. Series III: Formal Contracts
  4. Series IV: Unidentified Building Projects (Organized by Contractor)
  5. Series V: Blueprints and Drawings
  6. Series VI: Oversized Materials

Acquisition Note

Special Collections purchased this collection in 2003.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480