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John Tipton Testimony

 Collection
Identifier: MS-2086

  • Staff Only

John Tipton gave this testimony during the course of a legal dispute between Cottral Bailey and Andrew Greer that took place in Carter County, Tennessee in 1799. In it, Tipton states that Bailey directed him to give Greer 35 pounds of Virginia money. Instead of paying Greer in cash, Tipton (in his capacity of one of Jonathan Pugh's executors) allowed Greer 35 pounds of credit at the auction of Pugh's estate. Greer was to have six months from the time of the sale to pay his debt. The document is signed by Tipton and by two judges, Samuel Williams and John Casebolt.

Dates

  • 1799 July 25

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite and must be requested in advance. See www.special.lib.utk.edu for detailed information. Collections must be requested through a registered Special Collections research account.

Conditions Governing Use

The UT Libraries claims only physical ownership of most material in the collections. Persons wishing to broadcast or publish this material must assume all responsibility for identifying and satisfying any claimants on www.special.lib.utk.edu for detailed information. Collections must be requested through a registered Special Collections research account.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet

Abstract

John Tipton gave this testimony during the course of a legal dispute between Cottral Bailey and Andrew Greer that took place in Carter County, Tennessee in 1799. In it, Tipton states that Bailey directed him to give Greer 35 pounds of Virginia money. Instead of paying Greer in cash, Tipton (in his capacity of one of Jonathan Pugh's executors) allowed Greer 35 pounds of credit at the auction of Pugh's estate. Greer was to have six months from the time of the sale to pay his debt. The document is signed by Tipton and by two judges, Samuel Williams and John Casebolt.

Biographical/Historical Note

John Tipton was born to Jonathan and Elizabeth Tipton in Baltimore County, Maryland on August 15, 1730. He served with Andrew Lewis in Lord Dummore's War (1774) and later rose to the rank of Colonel in the Revolutionary War. Tipton was also deeply involved in politics. He began his political career in Virginia, where he served as the Justice of the Peace and Sheriff of Shenandoah County, as a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses (1774), as a member of the Virginia Constitutional Convention (1776), and as a member of the Virginia House of Delegates (1776-1777 and 1778-1781). He later relocated to Washington County, North Carolina (now part of Tennessee), where he served as the County's representative to the Franklin Conventions of 1784 and 1785, as a member of the House of Territory of the United States South of the River Ohio, and as a member of the Tennessee Constitutional Convention (1796). John Tipton died in April of 1813 and is buried in the Tipton-Haynes Cemetery in Carter County, Tennessee.

John Tipton was twice married. He had nine sons with his first wife, Mary Butler (d. 1776): Samuel (1752-1833), Benjamin (1755-1807), Abraham (1758-1781), William (1761-1849), Isaac (1763-1827), Jacob (1765-1791), John (1769-1831), Thomas (1771-1840/50), and Jonathan (1776-1858). Seven of these children served in the Revolutionary War alongside their father (including Abraham and Jacob, who were killed in action) and three, Samuel, John, and Jonathan, later entered politics. Tipton married Martha (Denton) Moore on July 22, 1777 in Shenandoah County, Virginia and the couple had a single son, Abraham (1781-1820).

Arrangement

This collection consists of a single folder.

Acquisition Note

The University of Tennessee's Special Collections Library purchased this document in March of 2009.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480