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Myron M. Comstock Letter

 Collection
Identifier: MS-2153

Myron Comstock writes to Verness Williams concerning his illness and homesickness. Myron's camp is located 1.5 miles northeast of Bardstown. Myron writes about the victory at Fort Donaldson [Donelson], which he describes as being 6 miles long with 80 to 40,000 men in it. He complains that he has written 24 letters since the first of February and only received 12.

Dates

  • 1862 February 21

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet

Abstract

This letter to Verness Williams documents recent activities of Myron Comstock's unit (11th Michigan Infantry Regiment) and speaks of his recent illness and homesickness.

Biographical/Historical Note

Myron M. Comstock was born in January of 1840 in Michigan. He joined Company F of the 11th Regiment of the Michigan Infantry (1st organization) as a private and was eventually promoted to corporal. This regiment was organized at White Pigeon, Michigan, and mustered in on September 24, 1861. Their first assignment was in Bardstown, Kentucky, where they served until March of 1862. They were then attached to Railroad Guard of the Department of the Ohio until September of 1862 and then to the 29th Brigade, 8th Division, Army of the Ohio, until November of 1862. Next, they served with the 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Center 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, until January of 1863 and the 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland until October of 1863. Finally, they were assigned to the 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 14th Army Corps, until September of 1864. At this time, the 11th Michigan was reorganized, but Myron Comstock chose to muster out instead of reenlisting.

After he left the army, Myron Comstock returned to Michigan and settled in Wheatland (Hillsdale County). In June of 1875, he was granted a pension of $2.00 per month as a result of a gunshot wound to his left thigh. He continued to live in Michigan with his daughter Laura (born in July of 1866) and worked as a day laborer until his death sometime between 1900 and 1910.

Arrangement

Collection consists of a single folder.

Acquisition Note

This collection is property of the University of Tennessee Libraries, Knoxville, Special Collections.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480