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Elkmont Property Papers

 Collection
Identifier: MS-3263

This collection houses photocopies of deeds and other documents showing land transfers and recording land owned by the Little River Company and the Appalachian Club in Elkmont, Tennessee. The bulk of the collection consists of land transfer deeds dating from 1881 to 1929. In addition to the 140 deeds, the collection includes photocopies of typed and handwritten notes tracing the history of the land transfers, hand-drawn maps of the area with cottage owners and locations noted, correspondence from the National Park Service regarding the area, and other materials.

Dates

  • 1838-1972 (bulk 1881-1929)

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.6 Linear Feet

Abstract

This collection houses photocopies of deeds and other documents showing land transfers and recording land owned by the Little River Company and the Appalachian Club in Elkmont, Tennessee. The bulk of the collection consists of land transfer deeds dating from 1881 to 1929.

Biographical/Historical Note

In the early 1900s, Colonel William P. Townsend purchased approximately 80,000 acres of land from people living near Elkmont to form the Little River Lumber Company. This logging company constructed the Little River Railroad, which soon became a popular mode of transportation for weekend travelers from Knoxville, especially after the Wonderland Hotel opened in Elkmont in 1912.

In 1910, the Little River Lumber Company deeded a tract of 50 acres of land to the Appalachian Club to build a clubhouse. Founded in 1907, the Appalachian Club was a hunting and fishing club made up primarily of weekend visitors from Knoxville. The lumber company later gave the club a ten-year lease of exclusive hunting and fishing privileges on some 40,000 acres.

Club members eventually built around forty cabins, which were used as summer residences. In the 1920s, when the movement to conserve the Smoky Mountains through the establishment of a national park was gaining momentum, Appalachian Club cottage owners were able to negotiate a provision that allowed them to sell their cottages at half-price to the federal government in exchange for lifetime leases. Most of these leases expired in the early 1990s.

Arrangement

This collection consists of six folders.

Acquisition Note

This collection is property of the University of Tennessee Libraries, Knoxville, Special Collections.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480