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Elizabeth Baker Crozier Journal

 Collection
Identifier: MS-1048

In this journal, Elizabeth (Baker) Crozier describes life in Knoxville during the siege of 1863. She recounts Union troops plundering and burning her home as well as destroying the homes of her friends and neighbors. She also recalls the kindness others as she and her husband attempted to reestablish a home and life for their family. In a small excerpt at the end, Crozier also writes of the death of her brother, Dr. Henry Baker, at the hands of Union troops. This document is a typewritten transcription of the original and totals 12 pages in length.

Dates

  • 1863-1864

Conditions Governing Access

Collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 2 business days are needed to retrieve these items for use. Researchers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

0.1 Linear Feet (1 folder)

Abstract

In this journal, Elizabeth (Baker) Crozier describes life in Knoxville during the siege of 1863. She recounts Union troops plundering and burning her home as well as destroying the homes of her friends and neighbors. She also recalls the kindness of others as she and her husband attempted to reestablish a home and life for their family. In a small excerpt at the end, Crozier also writes of the death of her brother, Dr. Henry Baker, at the hands of Union troops. This document is a typewritten transcription of the original and totals 12 pages in length.

Biographical/Historical Note

Elizabeth Buford Baker was born to Abner and Elizabeth (Buford) Baker in Kentucky in 1815. She married Carrick W. Crozier in 1835, and the couple had at least seven children, Mary Elizabeth "Lizzie," Robert Clark, Abner Baker, Sarah Letcher "Sallie," Kate, Blanche (who died in infancy), and Carrick White. Four of these children (Lizzie, Sallie, Katie, and Carrick) were living at home with their parents during the 1863 siege of Knoxville. In August of 1863, Carrick Crozier and his two older daughters fled Knoxville while Elizabeth Crozier and her two younger children remained behind in an attempt to save the family’s home and possessions as the fighting between Union and Confederate soldiers intensified near their property. They were unsuccessful, and the house was burned and the majority of their possessions looted and distributed among the Union troops. Elizabeth Crozier and her two youngest children fled and were displaced for eight months as they attempted to reunite with her husband and older children. The family managed to reassemble in Covington, Georgia and with the assistance of charitable people was able to reestablish themselves in Knoxville. Elizabeth (Baker) Crozier died in Knoxville on May 11, 1897.

Arrangement

This collection consists of a single folder.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480