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University Christian Association Records

 Collection
Identifier: AR-0164

This collection houses publications, correspondence, official records, photographs, scrapbooks, and other materials documenting Christian associations (including the YMCA and YWCA) on the University of Tennessee's campus between 1926 and 1969.

Dates

  • 1926-1969

Conditions Governing Access

Manuscript collections are stored offsite, and a minimum of 24 hours is needed to retrieve these items for research use. Readers interested in consulting any of the collections are advised to contact Special Collections.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright interests in this collection remain with the creator. For more information, contact the Special Collections Library.

Extent

43 Linear Feet (15 boxes and 30 scrapbooks)

Abstract

This collection houses publications, correspondence, official records, photographs, scrapbooks, and other materials documenting Christian associations (including the YMCA and YWCA) on the University of Tennessee's campus between 1926 and 1969.

Biographical/Historical Note

The YMCA was founded at the University of Tennessee on February 2, 1877. In 1890, a College Association Building (the second of its kind in the United States) was constructed on the Hill. Women were admitted to the University in 1893, and a branch of the YWCA was operating on campus by 1897. Protestantism flourished on campus from the 1920s to the 1950s as administrators sought to dispel the idea that a university education was inherently offensive to God by promoting Christian activities and founding the Tennessee School of Religion. All of the independent Christian organizations on campus were consolidated as the University Christian Associations in 1933, allowing them to share a single staff, budget, and program. The UCA organized such programs as the Mid-Winter Convocation, Freshman activities, Torch Night, Aloha Oe, the Student-Faculty Dinner, the Community Thanksgiving Service, and the Easter Sunrise Service. It flourished until the 1960s, when questions arose as to the legality of conducting religiously themed events on a public university's campus, professors began to express concerns that the Tennessee School of Religion's mission was inherently opposed to the University's academic trajectory, and the School of Religion's constitutionality was challenged.

Arrangement

This collection consists of fifteen boxes and twenty-eight scrapbooks.

Acquisition Note

This collection is the property of the University of Tennessee's Archives.

Repository Details

Part of the Betsey B. Creekmore Special Collections and University Archives, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Repository

Contact:
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN 37996 USA
865-974-4480